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OSHA Reminds Employers to Post Injury and Illness Summaries

By Nickole C. Winnett
  • February 22, 2017

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has reminded employers they must post a copy of the agency’s “Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses” (Form 300A) summarizing job-related injuries and illnesses logged during 2016.

OSHA said that each year, between February 1 and April 30, employers must display the Summary in a common area where notices to employees are usually posted. Employers must fill out and post the Summary annually, even if no recordable work-related injuries or illnesses occurred during the year. Businesses with 10 or fewer employees and those in certain low-hazard industries are exempt from OSHA recordkeeping and posting requirements. OSHA’s Recordkeeping Rule webpage itemizes employer recordkeeping requirements.

Under its recordkeeping regulation, OSHA requires certain covered employers to prepare and maintain records of serious occupational injuries and illnesses using the “Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses” (OSHA 300 Log). The agency noted, “This information is important for employers, workers and OSHA in evaluating the safety of a workplace, understanding industry hazards, and implementing worker protections to reduce and eliminate hazards.”

Under changes in OSHA recordkeeping requirements that went into effect January 1, 2015, the agency’s rules now affect newly covered industries. At the end of 2016, OSHA also updated its recordkeeping rule to clarify that employers are required to maintain OSHA 300 logs for a period of five years. Moreover, starting on January 1, 2017, certain employers are required to electronically submit information from their OSHA 300 logs and OSHA will then make that information publicly available on its website. Establishments with 20-249 employees in certain high-risk industries must electronically submit information from their 2016 OSHA 300A by July 1, 2017, and their 2017 OSHA 300A by July 1, 2018. Establishments with 250 or more employees must electronically submit information from their 2016 OSHA 300A by July 1, 2017, and their 2017 OSHA 300, 300A, and 301 (“Injury and Illness Incident Report”) by July 1, 2018.

Furthermore, the recordkeeping rules include reporting all work-related fatalities within eight hours. All work-related inpatient hospitalizations, amputations, and losses of an eye must be reported within 24 hours.

Fatalities and injuries can be reported to OSHA by contacting:

  • OSHA’s free and confidential number at 1-800-321-OSHA (6742)
  • The closest OSHA Area Office during normal business hours
  • OSHA through a new online form

Jackson Lewis is available to help employers understand their reporting obligations related to fatalities and injuries.

©2017 Jackson Lewis P.C. This Update is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice nor does it create an attorney/client relationship between Jackson Lewis and any readers or recipients. Readers should consult counsel of their own choosing to discuss how these matters relate to their individual circumstances. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written consent of Jackson Lewis.

This Update may be considered attorney advertising in some states. Furthermore, prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Jackson Lewis P.C. represents management exclusively in workplace law and related litigation. Our attorneys are available to assist employers in their compliance efforts and to represent employers in matters before state and federal courts and administrative agencies. For more information, please contact the attorney(s) listed or the Jackson Lewis attorney with whom you regularly work.

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