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State Minimum Wage Increases Effective January 1, 2012

By Paul DeCamp, Richard I. Greenberg, Noel P. Tripp and Jason A. Zoldessy
  • December 7, 2011

Employers with multi-state operations must remain abreast of developments in state wage and hour legislation, including, but not limited to, increases in the state minimum wage.  Pursuant to legislation providing for annual increases to state minimum wage rates based on increases in the U.S. Consumer Price Index and inflation, several states have announced minimum wage rate increases effective January 1, 2012.  The increases are as follows: 

Arizona – Standard minimum wage increases from $7.35 to $7.65 an hour.  Minimum wage for tipped employees increases from $4.35 to $4.65. (The definition of a “tipped employee” differs under many state laws.  However, the term is most commonly used for certain employees in the hospitality industry.)

Colorado – Standard minimum wage increases from $7.36 to $7.64 an hour.  Minimum wage for tipped employees increases from $4.34 to $4.62 an hour.

Florida – Standard minimum wage increases from $7.31 to $7.67 an hour.  Minimum wage for tipped employees increases from $4.29 to $4.65 an hour.

Montana – Standard wage increases from $7.35 to $7.65 an hour. (Montana law does not allow employers to take a tip credit against minimum wage for tipped employees.)

Ohio – Standard minimum wage increases from $7.40 to $7.70 an hour.  Minimum wage for tipped employees increases from $3.70 to $3.85 an hour.

Oregon – Standard wage increases from $8.50 to $8.80 an hour.  (Oregon law does not allow employers to take a tip credit against minimum wage for tipped employees.)

Vermont – Standard minimum wage increases from $8.15 to $8.46 an hour.  Minimum wage for tipped employees increases from $3.95 to $4.10 an hour.

Washington – Standard minimum wage increases from $8.67 to $9.04 an hour. (Washington law does not allow employers to take a tip credit against minimum wage for tipped employees.)

Certain localities also have implemented minimum wage legislation.  For example, in San Francisco, the minimum wage will increase from $9.92 to $10.24 an hour (California law does not allow employers to take a tip credit against minimum wage for tipped employees).  Such laws and regulations also must be monitored for changes.
 
Jackson Lewis attorneys are available to discuss these legislative changes and any other wage and hour issues applicable to your organization on a federal, state or local level.

©2011 Jackson Lewis P.C. This Update is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice nor does it create an attorney/client relationship between Jackson Lewis and any readers or recipients. Readers should consult counsel of their own choosing to discuss how these matters relate to their individual circumstances. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written consent of Jackson Lewis.

This Update may be considered attorney advertising in some states. Furthermore, prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Jackson Lewis P.C. represents management exclusively in workplace law and related litigation. Our attorneys are available to assist employers in their compliance efforts and to represent employers in matters before state and federal courts and administrative agencies. For more information, please contact the attorney(s) listed or the Jackson Lewis attorney with whom you regularly work.

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