Search form

Waiver Agreement Valid; Employee Cannot Sue for Sexual Harassment

By Andrew C. Pickett
  • February 20, 2002

Any employee who knowingly and voluntarily signed a severance agreement waiving her rights under Title VII cannot bring an action in court against her employer for sexual harassment. In a case of first impression, the U. S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (Boston) said there was no reason why a knowing and voluntary waiver viewed in light of the "totality of the circumstances" should not be given effect. Jackson Lewis represented the employer in the case. Melanson v. Browning-Ferris Industries Inc., No. 01-1914 (1st Cir., February 19, 2002).

©2002 Jackson Lewis P.C. This Update is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice nor does it create an attorney/client relationship between Jackson Lewis and any readers or recipients. Readers should consult counsel of their own choosing to discuss how these matters relate to their individual circumstances. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written consent of Jackson Lewis.

This Update may be considered attorney advertising in some states. Furthermore, prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Jackson Lewis P.C. represents management exclusively in workplace law and related litigation. Our attorneys are available to assist employers in their compliance efforts and to represent employers in matters before state and federal courts and administrative agencies. For more information, please contact the attorney(s) listed or the Jackson Lewis attorney with whom you regularly work.

See AllRelated Articles You May Like

February 4, 2016

Retail Employer Workplace News - Winter 2016

February 4, 2016

Top Five OSHA Changes to Watch for in 2016 Retailers should stay tuned in the year ahead to the busy agenda of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) as it attempts to finalize significant rulemakings and guidance documents. OSHA initiatives on electronic injury and illness recordkeeping, employer safety incentive... Read More

January 25, 2016

New York State and New York City Guidance Focus Transgender Discrimination

January 25, 2016

New York State and New York City have issued expansive new guidelines to protect the rights of transgender and gender non-conforming individuals. NYSDHR’s Regulations Ban Transgender Discrimination The New York State Division of Human Rights adopted new regulations, effective January 20, 2016, that ban discrimination and... Read More

December 17, 2015

New York City Council Adds Caregiver Status to List of Protected Classifications

December 17, 2015

Following other recent pro-employee legislation enacted in New York City, the New York City Council on December 16, 2015, passed a bill banning employment discrimination based on an individual’s actual or perceived status as a caregiver. (See our articles, New York City Issues Enforcement Guidance Related to City’s Fair... Read More

Related Practices