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Déjà Vu: Implications of a Government Shutdown on Federal Contractors

By Leslie A. Stout-Tabackman
  • February 7, 2018

For the second time in a month, for lack of agreement on funding the government long-term, we face the specter of a government shutdown.

The government shutdown that began on January 20, 2018, lasted three days. Congress ended that shutdown after voting on a stopgap measure to fund the government until February 8, 2018. As that date draws near, and Congress has not agreed on a spending bill to keep the government open, the threat of another government shutdown looms.

Employers should be prepared in the event no budget is agreed on by the deadline and the government shuts down. See our article, Implications of a Government Shutdown on Federal Contractors, on the employment and labor law concerns that a government shutdown raises.

Please contact a Jackson Lewis attorney with any questions.

©2018 Jackson Lewis P.C. This material is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute legal advice nor does it create a client-lawyer relationship between Jackson Lewis and any recipient. Recipients should consult with counsel before taking any actions based on the information contained within this material. This material may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

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