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Groundhog Day for Massachusetts Non-Compete Reform

By Erik J. Winton
  • August 1, 2016

Once again, the Massachusetts legislature was unable to agree on non-compete reform legislation by the July 31, 2016, end of the current legislative session. The House and Senate had passed versions of non-compete reform that differed on key provisions. At the end of the session, however, the House and Senate failed to pass a compromise bill. (For details, see our article, Down to the Wire for Proposed Non-Compete Reform Legislation in Massachusetts.)

While efforts at non-compete reform are dead in the water until the process begins anew at the start of the next two-year legislative session in January 2017, non-compete reform legislation appears to have moved closer to approval with each legislative session. Given Governor Charlie Baker’s public statement in support of some type of non-compete reform, non-compete legislation may have the momentum needed to gain support early in the next legislative session.

The focus on non-compete reform in Massachusetts, the passage of the Federal Defense of Trade Secrets Act, and case-law developments in this area, should provide employers with ample incentive to review their agreements and related processes to ensure that current agreements provide the best opportunity for enforcement and protection of valuable company assets. Simple process changes, such as ensuring that a non-compete agreement is discussed before or at the time an offer is extended, and following consistent protocol as to which employees are required to sign such agreements and when, can avoid costly litigation over the enforceability of a non-compete, or at least give employers a better chance at prevailing in such litigation. Changes to the agreements themselves, such as increasing protections of non-disclosure and non-solicitation provisions, can minimize the risk associated with employee departures even if non-compete reform becomes a reality in Massachusetts.

Please contact Jackson Lewis if you have any questions about non-compete, non-disclosure, and non-solicitation agreements.

©2016 Jackson Lewis P.C. This material is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute legal advice nor does it create a client-lawyer relationship between Jackson Lewis and any recipient. Recipients should consult with counsel before taking any actions based on the information contained within this material. This material may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Reproduction of this material in whole or in part is prohibited without the express prior written consent of Jackson Lewis P.C., a law firm that built its reputation on providing workplace law representation to management. Founded in 1958, the firm has grown to more than 900 attorneys in major cities nationwide serving clients across a wide range of practices and industries including government relations, healthcare and sports law. More information about Jackson Lewis can be found at www.jacksonlewis.com.

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