Search form

Labor Board Decision and Worker Scheduling Requests on Congress’ Plate

  • December 7, 2015

Congress will grapple with bills to overturn the federal labor board’s decision on joint employers and to make work schedules more predictable for workers in 2016.

Lawmakers have introduced identical legislation in both chambers of Congress to overturn a landmark decision by the National Labor Relations Board intended to broaden joint employer liability. By including employers who may only indirectly affect employees’ terms and conditions of employment, or have the right to affect such terms and conditions, the controversial Board decision has swept many more businesses under the “joint employer” umbrella and increased labor union bargaining power. (For details of the Board decision, see our article, Labor Board Sets New Standard for Determining Joint Employer Status.) The bills, H.R.3459 and S.2015, have been referred to committee. The House Subcommittee on Health, Employment, Labor, and Pensions has held hearings on the H.R.3459. At the beginning of December, the Senate bill had 48 cosponsors.

Requiring employers to consider their employees’ requests for changes to their work schedules and to provide more predictable and stable schedules for employees in certain occupations with evidence of unpredictable and unstable scheduling practices is the purpose of the Schedules That Work Act, H.R.3071 and S.1772. It also would require employers to make, keep, and preserve records of compliance with the Act, and post a notice in the workplace explaining employees’ rights under the Act. (For details, see our article, Bill in Congress Would Allow Employees to Request Changes to Schedules.)

Jackson Lewis attorneys in the Government Relations practice are available to answer inquiries regarding these and other workplace issues.

©2015 Jackson Lewis P.C. This Update is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice nor does it create an attorney/client relationship between Jackson Lewis and any readers or recipients. Readers should consult counsel of their own choosing to discuss how these matters relate to their individual circumstances. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written consent of Jackson Lewis.

This Update may be considered attorney advertising in some states. Furthermore, prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Jackson Lewis P.C. represents management exclusively in workplace law and related litigation. Our attorneys are available to assist employers in their compliance efforts and to represent employers in matters before state and federal courts and administrative agencies. For more information, please contact the attorney(s) listed or the Jackson Lewis attorney with whom you regularly work.

See AllRelated Articles You May Like

November 5, 2018

What Employers Should Watch For in Election 2018

November 5, 2018

Election Day may result in significant changes in our country’s labor and employment landscape. This article discusses some issues employers should watch closely. Arbitration Congressional Democrats have proposed legislation intended to overturn the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2018 ruling that employers do not violate the National Labor... Read More

October 30, 2018

Election 2018: Midterms’ Effect on Employment Law Issues and Advocacy

October 30, 2018

Voters will have the chance to determine the outcome of races for more than 6,000 legislative seats and 36 governorships, as well as weigh in on 160 or so statewide ballot measures, on Election Day, November 6, 2018. While the federal elections, including the battle for control of the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate,... Read More

October 23, 2018

New York City to Require Private Employers to Establish Lactation Rooms and Policies

October 23, 2018

Private employers in New York City will have to find space for a “lactation room” under legislation expected to be signed by Mayor Bill de Blasio. On October 17, 2018, the New York City Council passed two pieces of legislation (Intro. 879-A and Intro. 905-A) that will require employers to accommodate nursing mothers by providing a... Read More

Related Practices