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Make Room on Your Bulletin Board for the Nevada Pregnant Workers’ Fairness Act Notice

By Deverie J. Christensen
  • June 9, 2017

Nevada employers must post a notice on the Nevada Pregnant Workers’ Fairness Act immediately. Governor Brian Sandoval signed the Act into law on June 2, 2017, and the notice provisions took effect upon signing. All other provisions of the Act will take effect on October 1, 2017.

Under the Act, most employers with at least 15 employees must immediately:

  1. post a required notice in the workplace in a conspicuous place at their business locations, in an area that is accessible to employees;
  2. provide all new employees with a notice at the beginning of employment; and
  3. provide a notice to any employee, within 10 days, who informs her immediate supervisor that she is pregnant.

The mandated notice may be provided to employees electronically or in writing, and it must contain the following statements:

  1. Employees have the right to be free from discriminatory or unlawful employment practices (based on pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions) pursuant to NRS 613.335 and sections 2 to 8, inclusive, of the Act
  2. Female employees have the right to reasonable accommodation for a condition relating to pregnancy, childbirth, or a related medical condition

Employers should begin preparing to respond to requests for reasonable accommodations due to pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions. The Act does not simply prohibit discrimination; rather, it imposes many affirmative duties and obligations on employers to accommodate employees affected by pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.

We will provide further updates on the Act. Please contact a Jackson Lewis attorney with any questions about the Act or if you need assistance with its notice obligations.

©2017 Jackson Lewis P.C. This Update is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice nor does it create an attorney/client relationship between Jackson Lewis and any readers or recipients. Readers should consult counsel of their own choosing to discuss how these matters relate to their individual circumstances. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written consent of Jackson Lewis.

This Update may be considered attorney advertising in some states. Furthermore, prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Jackson Lewis P.C. represents management exclusively in workplace law and related litigation. Our attorneys are available to assist employers in their compliance efforts and to represent employers in matters before state and federal courts and administrative agencies. For more information, please contact the attorney(s) listed or the Jackson Lewis attorney with whom you regularly work.

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