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Massachusetts Amends Blue Laws to Allow for Operations of Warehouses on Sundays and Holidays

By Brian E. Lewis
  • August 19, 2016

Warehouses and delivery centers in Massachusetts can be opened on Sundays and holidays under a provision in the new economic development law amending the state’s “blue laws.” The Massachusetts blue laws, with a list of 55 exceptions, restrict certain commercial activities on Sundays and holidays. Governor Charlie Baker signed “An Act Relative to Job Creation and Workforce Development” (H. 4569) on August 10, 2016.

The revised exception states:

(31) The transport or delivery of goods in commerce, or for consideration, by motor truck or trailer or other means, and the performance of all activities incidental thereto, including the operation of all facilities and warehousing, necessary to prepare, stage, and effect such transport or delivery; or the loading or unloading of same and the performance of labor, business and work directly or indirectly related thereto.

Previously, the exception extended only to the “transport” of goods and commerce by motor truck or trailer. Now, the “delivery” of goods in commerce, as well as acts connected to the delivery of goods, such as the operations of facilities and warehouses related to the delivery, are expressly allowed under the blue laws. In addition, as written, automatic payment of time-and-a-half to employees involved in these activities is not require. Retail establishments still must pay time-and-a-half to employees working on Sundays and holidays.

Please contact Jackson Lewis with any questions about whether and how the revision affects your particular situation.

©2016 Jackson Lewis P.C. This Update is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice nor does it create an attorney/client relationship between Jackson Lewis and any readers or recipients. Readers should consult counsel of their own choosing to discuss how these matters relate to their individual circumstances. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written consent of Jackson Lewis.

This Update may be considered attorney advertising in some states. Furthermore, prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

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