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Using Predictive Analytics to Change History

By K. Joy Chin
  • May 11, 2017

Last year, women made 80¢ on the dollar compared to men. That persistent pay gap has hovered around 80% for the last several years. States, cities, and federal enforcement agencies are thus trying a variety of new tactics to “close the gap.” The most interesting, and as many believe creative, approach to gain popularity in the past year is prohibiting employers from asking applicants for salary history. Proponents of these salary history bans contend that preventing the use of salary history to determine starting pay will stop the perpetuation of wage discrimination. Banning requests for salary history will force employers to base salaries on an applicant’s — or the position’s — value to the company, rather than what an individual made in a previous position. This white paper explores what this means to employers.

©2017 Jackson Lewis P.C. This material is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute legal advice nor does it create a client-lawyer relationship between Jackson Lewis and any recipient. Recipients should consult with counsel before taking any actions based on the information contained within this material. This material may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

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