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Organized Labor Wins a Round: NLRB Eases the Way for Temporary Employees to Unionize

By Howard M. Bloom and Patrick L. Egan
  • October 1, 2000

According to a recent Labor Board ruling, temporary employees who are supplied to your company by an agency and who work at your workplace may now more easily be included in a voting unit along with your regular employees if

  1. your company and the company supplying the temps are determined to be "joint employers"; and
  2. the temps share a "community of interest" with your regular employees.

Since temps are more likely to have less loyalty to your company, this decision could have significant implications on your ability to remain union-free.

©2000 Jackson Lewis P.C. This material is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute legal advice nor does it create a client-lawyer relationship between Jackson Lewis and any recipient. Recipients should consult with counsel before taking any actions based on the information contained within this material. This material may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Reproduction of this material in whole or in part is prohibited without the express prior written consent of Jackson Lewis P.C., a law firm that built its reputation on providing workplace law representation to management. Founded in 1958, the firm has grown to more than 900 attorneys in major cities nationwide serving clients across a wide range of practices and industries including government relations, healthcare and sports law. More information about Jackson Lewis can be found at www.jacksonlewis.com.

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