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John M. Remy

Principal
Washington, D.C. Region

P 703-483-8321 F 703-483-8301
John.Remy@jacksonlewis.com

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John M. Remy

Biography

John M. Remy is a Principal in the Washington, D.C. Region office of Jackson Lewis P.C. With 11 jury trials in four states, he is one of D.C.'s preeminent employment defense litigators. From 2007 through 2017, Mr. Remy was the Office Managing Principal, and under his management, the office more than doubled in size and revenue.

Mr. Remy’s practice focuses on litigation and counseling. He represents employers in federal and state courts covering a wide range of statutes and subjects, including discrimination, retaliation, wrongful termination, and tort claims. He devotes a considerable part of his practice to litigating and advising employers on covenants to compete, breaches of duty of loyalty, and theft of trade secrets claims. 

As part of his counseling practice, Mr. Remy provides daily advice and training to management to help employers avoid litigation. His traditional labor experience includes handling representation cases and numerous unfair labor practice cases and labor arbitrations. He represents employers before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, National Labor Relations Board, Department of Labor, and numerous state and local agencies.

Mr. Remy is a frequent speaker before human resource organizations, and industry associations, and has been a guest lecturer at Virginia Tech and George Washington University. He is also an elected member of the firm’s Advisory Committee to the Board of Directors. He lives in Vienna, Virginia, with his wife and four children.

Examples of Trial Experience

  • Jose Salazar v. Lakeshore Learning Materials, Los Angeles Superior Court. Former manager, who was demoted and eventually laid off after allegedly complaining to CEO and VP of HR, brought claims of retaliation and age discrimination. Jury returned a defense verdict on all counts after the judge stated to the parties in a pre-trial conference that a plaintiff’s verdict was “very likely.”
  • Roberts v. Delta Solutions and Technologies, Inc., et al., Fairfax County Circuit Court. Former employee brought multiple claims relating to her termination and surrounding events and sought over $800,000. Ultimately, 14 claims of defamation against all defendants were tried. The jury returned a complete defense verdict on all claims.
  • Cooper v. Counterpart Int’l, Inc., D.C. Federal District Court. Terminated long-time employee with employment contract sought $2 million for breach of contract and tort claims. After eight-day trial, jury returned a defense verdict on all claims.
  • Leigh, et al. v. Airport Taxi Management, Anne Arundel County Circuit Court. Twelve plaintiffs brought claims for breach of contract, wrongful termination, intentional interference with economic relations, and fraud. After six-day trial, jury returned a defense verdict on all claims.
  • Rampersaud v. Federal Management Systems, Inc., Montgomery County Circuit Court. Plaintiff alleged five counts, including discriminatory termination, retaliation, and violation of the Family and Medical Leave Act. After two-week trial, the court granted directed verdict on two counts and the jury returned a defense verdict on remaining three counts.
  • Pabon v. MVM, Inc., et al., Loudoun County Circuit Court. Former employee brought claims of wrongful termination and tortious interference seeking over $5 million. Jury returned a defense verdict on all claims, save for a $15,000 award against one defendant that the plaintiff stipulated could not be sustained under Virginia law.
  • Luis Salazar v. Lakeshore Learning Materials, Los Angeles Superior Court. Former employee brought claims of retaliation and disability discrimination under seven counts. The jury returned a unanimous 12-0 verdict for the defendant on all counts.
  • Howard v. Lakeshore Learning Materials, Prince George’s County Circuit Court. Plaintiff brought a claim under the Maryland Wage Payment Law for unpaid vacation, treble damages, and attorney’s fees. At the close of the plaintiff’s case, the defense made a motion for judgment, which was granted by the Court. The Court dismissed the case and awarded costs to the employer.

Honors and Recognitions

  • One of the D.C. area’s “go to” SmartLawyers
  • SmartCEO Magazine, “Legal Elite” Reader's Poll
  • Virginia Business Magazine, Virginia's “Legal Elite”
John M. Remy
Rated by Super Lawyers


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Pro Bono and Community Involvement

  • American Cancer Society, Member, Corporate Council (2013-2014)
  • Habitat for Humanity of Northern Virginia, Board of Directors Member (2004-2015) and provides pro bono services
  • So Others Might Eat, Pro Bono Services