Search form

EEOC: Retaliation Tops Discrimination Charges Filed in Fiscal Year 2017

By Paul Patten
  • February 12, 2018

Retaliation was the most common workplace discrimination charge received by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in fiscal year (FY) 2017, according to the agency. (The fiscal year runs from October 1 to September 30.) Retaliation has been at the top since FY 2010.

A total of 84,254 charges were filed with the agency nationwide in FY 2017. Retaliation claims accounted for 48.8% of all charges.

The following is a complete breakdown of claims (some charges alleged multiple bases):

  • Retaliation: 41,097 (48.8%)
  • Race: 28,528 (33.9%)
  • Disability: 26,838 (31.9%)
  • Sex: 25,605 (30.4%)
  • Age: 18,376 (21.8%)
  • National Origin: 8,299 (9.8%)
  • Religion: 3,436 (4.1%)
  • Color: 3,240 (3.8%)
  • Equal Pay Act: 996 (1.2%)
  • Genetic Information: 206 (0.2%)

The EEOC recovered $398 million for discrimination complainants in FY 2017, which was less than the $482 million recovered by the EEOC in 2016. It received 6,696 sexual harassment charges and obtained $46.3 million in monetary benefits for sexual harassment complainants.

Further, according to EEOC data, the agency received 1,762 LGBT-based sexual discrimination charges and resolved 2,016 such charges in FY 2017. The agency has recovered a total of $16.1 million for LGBT individuals since beginning to collect LGBT charge data in
FY 2013.

Reducing Workload

The agency resolved 99,109 charges in FY 2017 and reduced its charge workload by 16.2%, to 61,621. This is the agency’s lowest level of inventory in a decade. New strategies to prioritize charges with merit, resolve investigations more quickly, and improve its digital systems are credited for the reduction.

Litigation

In FY 2017, the EEOC filed 184 merits lawsuits alleging discrimination. This was a significant increase from FY 2016, when the EEOC filed only 86 merits lawsuits. The 184 lawsuits filed included 124 individual suits, 30 suits involving multiple victims or discriminatory policies, and 30 systemic discrimination cases. At the end of the fiscal year, the agency had 242 cases on its active docket.

Received a Charge?

An employer is informed that a charge of discrimination has been filed against it when it receives a “Notice of a Charge of Discrimination” from the EEOC. The Notice may ask the employer to respond to the charge. Employers should consult with counsel to determine how best to respond.

To reduce the chances of receiving a charge, employers should be training management and human resource personnel on how to receive and address internal discrimination complaints. In addition, company policies and procedures regarding complaints should be drafted clearly and followed uniformly. These measures, if timely and effectively implemented, can mitigate the frequency of discrimination charges.

Please contact your Jackson Lewis attorney if you have any questions.

©2018 Jackson Lewis P.C. This material is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute legal advice nor does it create a client-lawyer relationship between Jackson Lewis and any recipient. Recipients should consult with counsel before taking any actions based on the information contained within this material. This material may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Reproduction of this material in whole or in part is prohibited without the express prior written consent of Jackson Lewis P.C., a law firm with more than 900 attorneys in major cities nationwide serving clients across a wide range of practices and industries. Having built its reputation on providing premier workplace law representation to management, the firm has grown to include leading practices in the areas of government relations, healthcare and sports law. For more information, visit www.jacksonlewis.com.

See AllRelated Articles You May Like

February 14, 2019

Rumors and Gossip in Workplace Can Create Employer Liability for Harassment, Fourth Circuit Holds

February 14, 2019

Employers may be liable under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act for failing to effectively address and stop gossip and rumors of an alleged sexual relationship between a female employee and a male supervisor, the federal appeals court in Richmond has held. Parker v. Reema Consulting Servs., No. 18-1206 (4th Cir. Feb. 8, 2019). This is... Read More

February 4, 2019

Amendment to New Jersey Anti-Discrimination Law Poses Challenges to Using Non-Disclosure and Jury Trial Waiver Provisions

February 4, 2019

An amendment to the New Jersey Law Against Discrimination (LAD) to prohibit enforcement of non-disclosure provisions in certain agreements, including employment contracts and settlement agreements, has been passed by the New Jersey Legislature. The amendment could also potentially impact use of jury trial waivers, given the LAD’s jury... Read More

January 7, 2019

2019: The Year Ahead for Employers

January 7, 2019

Over the past year, state and local governments responded in a variety of ways to national policy, and the midterm elections painted a picture of what’s in store for employers in 2019 and beyond. Jackson Lewis’ annual report outlines upcoming issues, trends, legislation and regulations employers need to be aware of in the coming year... Read More

Related Practices