Search form

New California Law Requires Sexual Harassment Prevention Training for Supervisors and Non-Supervisors

By Susan E. Groff and Jessica B. Armijo
  • October 1, 2018

California employers with at least five employees must provide sexual harassment prevention training and education to all supervisory employees and non-supervisory employees in California by January 1, 2020.

Since 2005, employers with at least 50 employees have been required to train and educate all personnel in supervisory positions in California in the prevention of sexual harassment. Senate Bill 1343 lowers the number of employees to five and includes non-supervisors in the mandate.

SB 1343 requires covered employers to provide at least two hours of sexual harassment prevention training and education to all supervisory employees and at least one hour of such training to all non-supervisory employees in California, by January 1, 2020. Training and education must be provided once every two years thereafter, as specified under the new law.

The new law also creates requirements for the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH).

Highlights

Under SB 1343:

  • By January 1, 2020, employers with at least five employees must provide: (1) at least two hours of sexual harassment prevention training to all supervisory employees; and (2) at least one hour of sexual harassment prevention training to all non-supervisory employees in California within six months of their assumption of either a supervisory or non-supervisory position. The training must be provided once every two years.
  • Employers must provide sexual harassment prevention training to temporary or seasonal employees within 30 calendar days after the hire date or within 100 hours worked if the employee will work for less than six months. In the case of a temporary employee employed by a temporary services employer (as defined by the California Labor Code) to perform services for clients, the training must be provided by the temporary services employer, not the client.
  • The anti-sexual harassment training may be conducted with other employees, as a group, or individually, and broken up into shorter time segments, as long as the two-hour requirement for supervisory employees and one-hour requirement for non-supervisory employees is reached.
  • Employers who provide the required trainings after January 1, 2019, are not required to comply with the January 1, 2020, deadline.
  • The DFEH must develop, obtain, and make available on its website the one-hour and two-hour anti-sexual harassment training courses for supervisory and non-supervisory employees. Employers may develop their own training platforms, as long as they comply with the law’s requirements.
  • The DFEH must make existing informational posters and fact sheets regarding sexual harassment prevention available to employers and to members of the public in English and other languages (as listed in the law) on the department’s internet website.

***

Please contact Jackson Lewis with any questions about the new law and compliance with the expanded training requirements and to schedule training.

©2018 Jackson Lewis P.C. This Update is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended as legal advice nor does it create an attorney/client relationship between Jackson Lewis and any readers or recipients. Readers should consult counsel of their own choosing to discuss how these matters relate to their individual circumstances. Reproduction in whole or in part is prohibited without the express written consent of Jackson Lewis.

This Update may be considered attorney advertising in some states. Furthermore, prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Jackson Lewis P.C. represents management exclusively in workplace law and related litigation. Our attorneys are available to assist employers in their compliance efforts and to represent employers in matters before state and federal courts and administrative agencies. For more information, please contact the attorney(s) listed or the Jackson Lewis attorney with whom you regularly work.

See AllRelated Articles You May Like

October 4, 2018

New York Law Requires Human Trafficking Informational Cards in Hotels, Considering Employee Training

October 4, 2018

All hotels in New York with at least five rooms will be required to post human trafficking “informational cards” throughout each hotel’s premises beginning October 14, 2018. The new statute (Ch. 190 of 2018) affords a hotel three options in selecting the “informational card” it will use: Create its own “informational card”;... Read More

October 2, 2018

California Restricts Confidentiality Provisions Concerning Information Related to Sexual Harassment

October 2, 2018

California Governor Jerry Brown has signed three bills into law that restrict employers in the securement of non-disclosure, release, and non-disparagement agreements that attempt to limit parties in discussing sexual harassment-related factual information. Senate Bill 820 (SB 820) Settlement agreements that prevent an individual... Read More

October 2, 2018

New York State Issues Final Guidance Regarding Combating Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

October 2, 2018

The State of New York has issued final guidance on combating sexual harassment in the workplace. This includes updated guidance on the mandatory sexual harassment prevention policies and annual employee training applicable to employers in New York beginning October 9, 2018. The updated final guidance and other resources, including a... Read More

Related Practices