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New York City Employers Must Grant Temporary Work Schedule Changes Beginning July 18

By Richard I. Greenberg and Daniel J. Jacobs
  • January 25, 2018

Starting on July 18, 2018, New York City employers will be required to provide temporary schedule changes to employees for a “personal event.”

Int. 1399-A became law on January 19, 2018, after Mayor Bill de Blasio failed to sign or veto the bill. 

Under Int. 1399-A, with limited exceptions, an employer must grant an employee’s request for a temporary change to the employee’s work schedule because of a “personal event.” The bill entitles employees to no more than two such requests in a calendar year, for up to one business day per request.

The employer also may fulfill its obligation by permitting an employee to use two business days for one request.

The law also protects employees from employer retaliation for making certain other schedule change requests. Int. 1399-A amends Chapter 12 of title 20 of the administrative code of the City of New York (commonly referred to as the “Fair Workweek Law”) by adding a new subchapter 6. For details of Int. 1399-A, including definitions, employee obligations, and exemptions, see our article, New York City Employers Must Grant Temporary Work Schedule Changes under Bill Passed by City Council.

Int. 1399-A’s employee protections will take effect on July 18, 2018. If employees are covered by a valid collective bargaining agreement in effect on that date, then the law will take effect on the date of termination of such agreement.

The Director of the Office of Labor Standards has the power to promulgate additional rules regarding the implementation of this law before the effective date.

Jackson Lewis will offer further updates on the law as agency guidance is available. Please contact the Jackson Lewis attorney with whom you regularly work for assistance in modifying your organization’s practices to comply with the new law.

©2018 Jackson Lewis P.C. This material is provided for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute legal advice nor does it create a client-lawyer relationship between Jackson Lewis and any recipient. Recipients should consult with counsel before taking any actions based on the information contained within this material. This material may be considered attorney advertising in some jurisdictions. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Reproduction of this material in whole or in part is prohibited without the express prior written consent of Jackson Lewis P.C., a law firm that built its reputation on providing workplace law representation to management. Founded in 1958, the firm has grown to more than 900 attorneys in major cities nationwide serving clients across a wide range of practices and industries including government relations, healthcare and sports law. More information about Jackson Lewis can be found at www.jacksonlewis.com.

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